Magnus Carlsen retains World Championship title with a spectacular final move

Magnus Carlsen retained his World Chess Championship title winning the rapid tie-break 3-1. Carlsen admitted that he was aiming for this since the start of game 11.

Carlsen had endured frustration throughout the match and this continue for a while today in the rapids. Carlsen drew the first rapid game with few scares before obtaining a huge and at times winning advantage in game two. The finish was not so easy to find and eventually Karjakin escaped with a draw.

The third game was Carlsen's breakthrough. He employed a radical piece of preparation in the Ruy Lopez where he went for a kingside attack with black. A spectacular pawn sacrifice left him with a dominant position, it may have been that Karjakin could have made life much harder for the champion but after a few moves his risk paid off and with the clock counting down Karjakin allowed a simple finish.

Carlsen allowed Karjakin to play a quite sharp Sicilian in game four where he only needed a draw and employed a slightly unusual sideline that soon left him with a solid advantage. Carlsen looked a little nervous and allowed a bit of counterplay. When Karjakin was desperately short of time Carlsen let him attack but he had everything worked out. The finish will go down in history. I suspect Karjakin saw it as he at first retracted the move 48...Qf2 but seeing nothing better he played it away and Carlsen finished with 49 Rc8+ Kh7 50 Qh6+ sacrificing his queen for forced mate and the retention of his title.

This is Carlsen's third World Championship victory and the closest call he has had. Karjakin admitted to some mitakes, he had trouble remembering what was probably an emmense amount of opening preparation throughout the match. Carlsen's previous World Championship experience allowed his preparation to be more effective than Karjakin's who will no doubt have learned a lot if he gets another shot.

"In rapid chess it's better to be in a good shape and I wasn't" Karjakin and he thought that his opening preparation for that was too much.

"It was an advanrage not to think so much about game 12 and he did." said Carlsen who took that game to a quick draw. "Playing four games instead of one seemed a very good idea."

Carlsen was very worried after his game 8 loss. "I had all sorts of negative thoughts in my head."

Final score Carlsen 6 Karjakin 6 in classical time control games. Carlsen 3 Karjakin 1 in rapid games.

Carlsen retained his title on his 26 birthday. A truly memorable day for him.

World Championship match heads into the final game all square

The eleventh game of the World Chess Championship in New York was drawn leaving the match tied at 5.5-5.5 with just Monday's game to go. If that game is also drawn the match will finish on Wednesday with a rapid and possibly blitz tie-break match.

Carlsen replied to Karjakin's Ruy Lopez with the classical 3...a6 instead of the Berlin. 16.f5 was a novelty from Karjakin but it was Carlsen who took the initiative after 18.h3 with the sequence 18...c3 19.bxc3 d5! Karjakin thought for 25 minutes before playing 20.Bg5. The position remained objectively equal even though Carlsen was a pawn down. Carlsen kept the game alive wtih 24...e3 but soon the logical finish was a perpetual check and they finished on move 34.

Carlsen will surely be happy to draw comfortably with black and cause some mild discomfort for his opponent.

There is a rest day Sunday.

Score Carlsen 5.5 Karjakin 5.5

Game 12 Monday 28th November 2pm local time 7pm UK time. Carlsen vs Karjakin.

WCh New York
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 42 A45 Trompowsky
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 33 C84 Ruy Lopez Centre Attack
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 78 C67 Ruy Lopez Berlin
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 94 C88 Ruy Lopez Closed
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 51 C50 Giuoco Piano
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 32 C88 Ruy Lopez Closed
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 33 D10 Slav Defence
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey 0-1 52 D05 Colle System
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 74 C78 Ruy Lopez Moeller Defence
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey 1-0 75 C65 Ruy Lopez Berlin
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 34 C84 Ruy Lopez Centre Attack

WCh New York (USA), 11-30 xi 2016
Name Ti NAT Rtng 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total Perf
Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2853 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ . 2772
Karjakin, Sergey g RUS 2772 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ . 2853

 

World Championship match heads into the final game all square

The eleventh game of the World Chess Championship in New York was drawn leaving the match tied at 5.5-5.5 with just Monday's game to go. If that game is also drawn the match will finish on Wednesday with a rapid and possibly blitz tie-break match.

Carlsen replied to Karjakin's Ruy Lopez with the classical 3...a6 instead of the Berlin. 16.f5 was a novelty from Karjakin but it was Carlsen who took the initiative after 18.h3 with the sequence 18...c3 19.bxc3 d5! Karjakin thought for 25 minutes before playing 20.Bg5. The position remained objectively equal even though Carlsen was a pawn down. Carlsen kept the game alive wtih 24...e3 but soon the logical finish was a perpetual check and they finished on move 34.

Carlsen will surely be happy to draw comfortably with black and cause some mild discomfort for his opponent.

There is a rest day Sunday.

Score Carlsen 5.5 Karjakin 5.5

ame 12 Monday 28th November 2pm local time 7pm UK time. Carlsen vs Karjakin.

WCh New York
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 42 A45 Trompowsky
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 33 C84 Ruy Lopez Centre Attack
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 78 C67 Ruy Lopez Berlin
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 94 C88 Ruy Lopez Closed
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 51 C50 Giuoco Piano
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 32 C88 Ruy Lopez Closed
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 33 D10 Slav Defence
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey 0-1 52 D05 Colle System
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 74 C78 Ruy Lopez Moeller Defence
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey 1-0 75 C65 Ruy Lopez Berlin
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 34 C84 Ruy Lopez Centre Attack

 

WCh New York (USA), 11-30 xi 2016
Name Ti NAT Rtng 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total Perf
Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2853 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ . 2772
Karjakin, Sergey g RUS 2772 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ . 2853

 

Carlsen levels World Championship match after nervy game 10

Magnus Carlsen won an extremely tense six and half hour struggle against Sergey Karjakin to equalise the match at 5-5. In a game with many turning points it looked for a long time like Karjakin would hold out for a draw but Carlsen eventually showed some of the skills that make him the best player in the World and finally broke the resistance Karjakin.

Carlsen returned to the quiet 4.d3 against the Berlin and hoped to outplay his opponent in a long positional game. Karjakin looked to be under a small amount of pressure before Carlsen erred with 19.Bxe6 which computers immediately pronounced as an equal position with 20.Nxf2 and 21.Nxf2. After this an extremely long endgame resulted where Carlsen could press at will it seemed and Karjakin had to wait. Karjakin could have tried to play g5 at some point but clearly felt his position was a fortress. Carlsen showed his great experience in winning endgames against the best by waiting and waiting for his only breakthrough try with b5. He eventually played it under the best circumstances after 56...Rhh7? and was winning after second time control. Karjakin gambled with 61.Rhc7 and was rewarded with the inferior 62.Nd5 but even so the defensive task was beyond him.

This was a far from perfect game but was at times an unbearably tense struggle which leaves the match tied at 5-5 with two games to go and possible rapid and blitz tiebreaks after that.

Rest day Friday 25th November.

Game 11 Saturday 26th November 2pm local time 7pm UK time. Karjakin vs Carlsen.

 

Carlsen keeps his hopes alive after clinging on to draw World Championship Game 9

Magnus Carlsen came under severe pressure in game 9 of the World Chess Championship as his hopes of retaining his title hung in the balance.

Carlsen played one of the sharper variations of the Ruy Lopez with 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 this may or may not be called the Arkhangelsk depending on who you consult. Carlsen ended up a pawn down in a position that should be holdable but was under undeniable pressure.

33.Qc2?! Rb4! allowed equalisation but instead after 33...Ra8?! Carlsen's whole campaign was in the balance. 38...Ne7 was a commital decision which was not liked by computers but for humans it was probably fine. 39.Qb3 was the move recommended by a computer but after 39.Bxf7 the game drifted to a draw where Carlsen wasn't seriously in trouble.

Carlsen has the first of his two remain games with the white pieces on Thursday

Score Karjakin 5 - Carlsen 4.

 

Karjakin leads World Championship after 8 games following loss of objectivity from Carlsen

Sergey Karjakin became favourite to become the new World Chess Champion after defeating Magnus Carlsen with the black pieces in game 8 and took a 4.5-3.5 lead with just four games to go.

Carlsen chose the Zuckertort Colle which didn't produce any advantage but had the merit of avoiding detailed opening preparation and kept many pieces on the board.

For most of the game Carlsen seemed to be trying to provoke Karjakin to action and this became more and more extreme as the game approached first time control. Carlsen has played with such abandon before, especially in a couple of Olympiads, but it hasn't led to good results. He is a much weaker player when in this mindset and today his aggression was brave but again ended poorly. Carlsen seemed to play the entire game with an attitude of someone who felt he had to win. There were far too many risks for too little upside from Carlsen.

Carlsen complicated things with his 24...bxc4 (if he wanted this structure he'd have been better with more rooks on playing 22...bxc4) and 28.f4 continued the risky play. 31.h3 again put white in more danger for unclear chances. As Carlsen's and Karjakin's clocks ticked down (they had 30 seconds a move at least) 35.c5 was a clear losing blunder from Carlsen, but 37...Qd3? returned the favour allowing 38.Nxe6+ and equality at first time control. 44.Qc6 was an attempt by Carlsen to continue his aggression when he could have brought things to a swift, drawing conclusion, with 44.Qg6+. Carlsen probably missed 49...Qc5 in response to his 49. Qa5 but it was only finally with 51.Qe6? that Karjkin found himself in another winning position and after 51...h5! the game ended just a move later.

The dynamics of the match have changed and the final games will have to be more tactical from Carlsen. This might act in Carlsen's favour but Karjakin must have the better chances with just four games to go. It's hard to avoid the impression that Carlsen went a little crazy today for no good reason.

Score Karjakin 4.5 Carlsen 3.5

 

Carlsen holds second draw in a row with
black in World Championship Game 7

The World Chess Championship match between Magnus Carlsen and Sergey Karjakin remains tied after 7 draws.

Karjakin switched from 1.e4 to 1.d4 and Carlsen replied with the Slav Defence. This wasn't a complete surprise from either player but it soon became apparent that yet again Carlsen was the better prepared.

Carlsen's 10...Nc6 was a rare move only played once before and Karjakin's response 11.Nd2 was not a good one allowing black at least equality, if not a small edge. If Carlsen had wanted to try for more then probably 15...f5 was the try. As it was both players headed for an early finish when Carlsen played the pretty careless 16...Rc8? losing a pawn. As it was it didn't cause too much damage as the resulting endgame was very drawish, but Carlsen could have drawn from a position of strength with almost any other move. 19...Bf6 seemed to show Carlsen was on top of the task of drawing and the players agreed a draw on move 33.

Thus Carlsen has survived two games in a row with black with few scares and now has white in three of the last five games. Can he make this count?

Score Carlsen 3.5 Karjkin 3.5

Game 8 Monday 21st November 2pm local time 7pm New York Carlsen vs Karjakin

WCh New York (USA), 11-30 xi 2016
Name Ti NAT Rtng 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total Perf
Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2853 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ . . . . . 2772
Karjakin, Sergey g RUS 2772 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ . . . . . 2853
WCh New York
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 42 A45 Trompowsky
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 33 C84 Ruy Lopez Centre Attack
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 78 C67 Ruy Lopez Berlin
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 94 C88 Ruy Lopez Closed
Carlsen, Magnus - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 51 C50 Giuoco Piano
Karjakin, Sergey - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 32 C88 Ruy Lopez Closed

Carlsen holds a comfortable draw with black in World Championship game 6

Magnus Carlsen played the Marshall Gambit of the Ruy Lopez in game 6 of the World Chess Championship. Black gives up a pawn for active play. This leads to sharper play and often complete equality. That was the case today. Carlsen was prepared very deeply and the resulting position left little to play for.

This was the first of two games in a row where Carlsen was due black and this forcing variation may have been part of a strategy to cope with that. Plus Carlsen didn't play that well the day before. Now the players have a day off before Suday's game 7.

Carlsen obtem empate confortável com as pretas na sexta partida do Campeonato do Mundo
Mark Crowther - Sexta-feira 18 de novembro de 2016

Magnus Carlsen jogou Gambito Marshall da Ruy Lopez na sexta partida do Campeonato Mundial de Xadrez. Entregou um peão em troca de jogo ativo. Isto levou a uma partida mais nítida e com muita igualdade. Esse foi o caso hoje. Carlsen veio preparado  e a posição resultante deixou pouco para jogar.

Esta foi a primeira das duas partidas em que Carlsen joga de pretas e essa mudança forçada pode ter sido parte de uma estratégia para lidar com isso. Carlsen não jogou tão bem no dia anterior. Agora os jogadores têm um dia de folga antes da próxima partida.

Score Carlsen 3 - Karjakin 3 all drawn.

 

Karjakin gets his first winning chances in World Championship game 5

The fifth game of the World Chess Championship in New York finished in a draw after 51 moves leaving the match tied at 2.5-2.5.

Magnus Carlsen played the fashionable Giuoco Piano but it didn't really go his way for most of the game even though he'd clearly prepared it quite deeply. After 19.dxe5 Karjakin had a couple of interesting options 19...Qh4 which he played and 19...a5 but he then turned down sharp play with 20...Bxc5 and it looked like he was settling for another draw.

Black's position was pretty solid and it was here Carlsen, with a small edge started to drift and at first time control the position was level with black having the only chances in the position. Carlsen's 41.Kg2 was a poor move which gave Karjakin a serious advantage if he had used the opportunity to take the h-file. Karjakin's first comment after the game was he should have played 43...Rh8 instead of 43...Bd5. Carlsen had immediate equality with 44.Kg3 but there were scary variaitons and his 44.e6 worked well in practice. 45...Qe7 was played quickly and after 46.Rh2 real equality was established and the game had no further adventures and was drawn on move 51.

El primer comentario de Karjakin después del partido fue que debería haber jugado 43 ... Rh8 en lugar de 43 ... Bd5. Carlsen tenía igualdad inmediata con 44.Kg3 pero había variaitons asustadizos y su 44.e6 funcionó bien en la práctica. 45 ... Qe7 se jugó rápidamente y después de 46.Rh2 la igualdad real se estableció y el juego no tenía más aventuras y se dibujó en movimiento 51. tiempo de control de la posición era el nivel de negro que tiene las únicas posibilidades en la posición.

Carlsen admitted he made errors "I was lucky" and seemed very disappointed with his play.

Score Carlsen 2.5 Karjakin 2.5

(Tradução google tradutor com alguns ajustes. Carvalho)

Karjakin após ficar inferior nas 4 partidas, obtém, na quinta partida  sua primeira chance de vitória neste match do  Campeonato Mundial
Mark Crowther - sexta-feira 18 de novembro de 2016

A quinta partida do Campeonato Mundial de Xadrez em Nova York terminou em empate após 51 jogadas deixando o natch empatado em 2.5-2.5.

Magnus Carlsen jogou o Giuoco Piano da moda, mas ele realmente não pode seguir com melhor plano, embora ele tenha claramente preparado profundamente. Depois de 19.dxe5 Karjakin teve um par de opções interessantes 19 ... Qh4 que ele jogou e 19 ... a5, mas ele, em seguida, recusou jogar afiado com 20 ... Bxc5 e parecia que ele estava se estabelecendo para outro empate.

A posição do preto era bastante sólida e então Carlsen, com um pequeno deslize ficou inferior e no primeiro controle de tempo a posição era nivelado mas com as pretas com melhores chances  na posição. O lance 41.Kg2 de Carlsen foi fraco. Deu a Karjakin uma grande vantagem se ele aproveitasse a oportunidade de dominar a coluna "H". O primeiro comentário de Karjakin  após a partida foi ele deveria ter jogado 43 ... Rh8 em vez de 43 ... Bd5. Carlsen teve igualdade imediata com 44.Kg3 mas como havia linhas perigosas o seu 44.e6 funcionou bem na prática. 45 ... Qe7 foi jogado rapidamente e depois 46.Rh2 a real igualdade foi estabelecida numa partida sem mais aventuras e o empate foi desenhado apos o lance 51.

Carlsen admitiu que cometeu erros "eu tive sorte" e parecia muito desapontado com sua atuação.

Pontuação Carlsen 2.5 Karjakin 2.5

 

Carlsen frustrated again by Karjakin in World Championship game 4

Magnus Carlsen outplayed Sergey Karjakin with black and again achieved a winning position before failing to convert this advantage to a win in game 4 of the World Chess Championship in New York. This followed Karjakin's save in drawing the previous game.

There was a classical Ruy Lopez and Karjakin's 14.Ng3 was a novelty. 19.Bxc4 was a serious error from Karjakin leaving him under pressure. Carlsen kept fine control until 45...f4?! which left him with a stable advantage but one not sufficient for a win. Carlsen's first comment after the game was that he thought this won by force. 45...Be6 or 45...gxf4 should have led to a decisive advantage.

Carlsen tried for a long time after this but Karjakin held the fortress and the game was drawn in 94 moves.

Ir's hard to say who has the psychological advantage. Carlsen who failed to win two games in a row where he should have or Sergey Karjakin who managed to save these positions.

Standings after game 4 Carlsen 2 Karjakin 2.

(Tradução google tradutor com alguns ajustes. Carvalho)

Carlsen frustrado novamente por Karjakin na quarta partida do Campeonato Mundial
Mark Crowther - quarta-feira, novembro 16, 2016

Magnus Carlsen superou Sergey Karjakin com as pretas mais uma vez alcançando uma posição vencedora mas não conseguindo converter esta vantagem em uma vitória na quarta partida do Campeonato Mundial de Xadrez, em Nova York. Isto seguiu-se poupanças Karjakin para desenhar o jogo anterior.

Jogou-se uma Ruy Lopez clássico e Karjakin apresentou uma novidade com 14.Ng3, porém com. 19.Bxc4, ( grave erro ) deixou Karjakin sob pressão. Carlsen manteve o controle fino até 45 ... f4! O que deixou uma vantagem estável, mas não o suficiente para vencer. primeiro comentário de Carlsen após a partida foi que ele pensou que tinha ganho forçado.  45 ... Be6 ou 45 ...gxf4 deveria ter conduzido a uma vantagem decisiva.

Carlsen tentou por um longo tempo, mas Karjakin sustentou  sua forte defesa e o empate conquistado em 94 lances.

É difícil dizer que tem a vantagem psicológica. Carlsen, que não conseguiu ganhar duas partidas seguidas ou Sergey Karjakin que salvou essas posições.

Karjakin escapes after marathon game three against Carlsen

Magnus Carlsen will be cursing himself after allowing Sergey Karjakin to escape with a draw in game three after a nearly 7 hours of play.

Carlsen found an unusual idea on the white side in a noramlly drawish variation of the Berlin Defence to the Ruy Lopez. His 10.Re2 (rather than the notmal Re1) led to a queenless middlegame where Carlsen clearly felt he would be more at home than his opponent. Karjakin initially reacted well but starting with 30...Ra2 he started to play inaccurately and 31...c5 lost a pawn although he clearly retained drawing chances.

White was winning after move 40 but the position remained difficult to calculate. 42.Rb8+ was one possible improvement and 44.Ke4 was definitely better than 44.Rxd7+ after which Karjakin definitely had drawing chances with best play.

The next phase saw errors from both sides. 64...Be7? (64...Kf8), 70.Nc6 (70.Re8!) 70...Kxf5? (70.Rc3!), 71.Na5 (winning but 71.Re1 or 71.Re2 was clearer) and the final mistake 72.Rb7? after which Karjakin found the only drawing idea with 72...Ra1! and the game was drawn on move 78.

I'm not qualified to assess the extended complex endgame but it was terribly difficult for both sides and the errors especially near the end when tiredness set in were understandable. This draw has to be a boost for Karjakin, the consequences of losing this might have been serious. Will the knowledge that he missed several wins affect Carlsen?

Score Carlsen 1.5 - Karjakin 1.5

(Tradução google tradutor com alguns ajustes. Carvalho)

Karjakin escapa após maratona na terceira partida  contra  Carlsen
Mark Crowther - terça-feira novembro 15, 2016

Magnus Carlsen está amaldiçoando-se depois de permitir que Sergey Karjakin escapasse com um empate na partida 3 depois de quase 7 horas de jogo.

Carlsen encontrou uma idéia incomum de brancas em uma variante morna na defesa Berlinesa da Ruy Lopez. Seu lance 10.Re2 (em vez do não  original Re1) levou a um meio jogo onde Carlsen se sentiu mais em casa do que seu oponente. Karjakin inicialmente reagiu bem, mas depois de 30 ... Ra2 começou a jogar sem calcular bem.  31 ... c5 perde um peão, mas com possibilidades de empate.

Branco ficou melhor após p lance 40, mas a posição manteve-se difícil de calcular. 42.Rb8 + era uma possível melhora e 44.Ke4 foi definitivamente melhor do que 44.Rxd7 + Karjakin definitivamente tinha  melhor jogo.

Nesta fase viu-se  erros de ambos os lados. 64 ... Be7? (64 ... KF8), 70.Nc6 (70.Re8!) 70 ... Kxf5? (70.Rc3!), 71.Na5 (ganhar, mas 71.Re1 ou 71.Re2 estava mais clara) e do erro final 72.Rb7? Ao que Karjakin achou a idéia de desenhar apenas 72 ... Ra1! E o jogo foi desenhado em 78 movimentos.

Eu não estou qualificado para avaliar um final tão complexo e extenso, mas foi terrivelmente difícil para ambos os lados, especialmente perto do fim quando o cansaço estabelecido era compreensível. Este empate deve ser creditado a Karjakin. As consequências de uma derrota poderia ter sido grave. Será que o fato de ter perdido várias chances de vitórias poderá afetar Carlsen?

Pontuação 1,5 Carlsen - Karjakin 1,5

Carlsen holds Karjakin to a draw with black in World Championship Game 2

Sergey Karjakin played the Ruy Lopez in game two of the World Chess Championship, his first with white, and Magnus Carlsen repeated a classical line he had used to beat Veselin Topalov in June in the Grand Chess Tour rapid event in Paris.

The game itself wasn't that thrilling. Carlsen's 12...Re8 was a departure from his game against Topalov and 13.Ra1 was a new move by Karjakin played after some thought.

The game was pretty much equal after 19 moves and Karjakin's 22.Ne2 was a tacit draw offer. Carlsen tried to extend the game a little with 22...Bb4 rather than 22...Nxe4 but the game was nevertheless drawn by repetition in 33 moves.

Score Carlsen 1 Karjakin 1.

(Tradução google tradutor com alguns ajustes. Carvalho)

Mark Crowther - Sábado 12 de novembro de 2016

Sergey Karjakin jogou a Ruy Lopez na segunda partida do Campeonato Mundial de Xadrez, jogando de brancas, e Magnus Carlsen repetiu uma linha clássica que ele usou para derrotar Veselin Topalov em junho no evento Grand Chess Tour em Paris.

O jogo em si não foi tão emocionante. Carlsen jogou 12 ... Te8 numa partida contra Topalov e 13.Ra1 foi uma novidade de Karjakin jogada depois de longa e profunda análise.

A partida foi igual após 19 lances. No lance 22.Ne2 Karjakin insinuou uma oferta de empate. Carlsen tentou estender o jogo um pouco mais ... Bb4 22 em vez de 22 ... Nxe4 mas a partida no entanto foi acalmada pela repetição em 33 lances.

 

Carlsen's Trompowsky neutralised as World Championship Game 1 is drawn

Carlsen and Karjakin draw the first game of their World Chess Championship match in New York.

Magnus Carlsen opened his World Championship defence against Sergey Karjakin with a small surprise when he chose the Trompowsky Attack. 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 doesn't hope for much of an advantage at this level and Carlsen got little or no edge.

Karjakin considered his options at move 6 before playing 6...e6 and 8.Nd2 was the first new move. 10...Na5 was interesting and Carlsen spent 15 minutes over 12.Qc2. After 14...Qd5 Carlsen had nothing better than to enter an endgame with 15.Nxc4 which was only very slightly better for white.

25.Ne1 perhaps didn't turn out as well for white as Carlsen had hoped. Perhaps the more natural try was 25.g4.

After 27.f4 h5 the game moved closer to equality. 31...a5 was an accurate move from Karjakin.

Carlsen fell behind on the clock for the first time. Rooks came off on move 35 and a draw seemed inevitable. Carlsen pressed a little with not much and Karjakin defended very solidly and the game was agreed drawn on move 42.

 

A Trompowsky de Carlsen  foi neutralizada.

Mark Crowther - Sexta-feira 11 de novembro de 2016

Carlsen e Karjakin empataram a primeira partida do match do Campeonato Mundial de Xadrez, em Nova York.

Magnus Carlsen abriu a defesa do campeonato mundial contra Sergey Karjakin com um pouco de surpresa quando ele escolheu o ataque Trompowsky. 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 não espera muita vantagem a este nível e Carlsen tem pouco ou nenhum benefício.

Karjakin considerou suas opções em Movimento 6 antes de jogar 6 ... e6 e 8.Nd2 foi o primeiro movimento novo. 10 ... Na5 era interessante e Carlsen passou 15 minutos mais 12.Qc2. Depois de 14 ... QD5 Carlsen não tinha nada melhor para entrar um final com 15.Nxc4 foi apenas um pouco melhor para o branco.

25. Ne1 não se revelou muito bom pelo que Carlsen esperava. Talvez a tentativa mais natural era 25.g4.

Após o jogo 27.f4 h5 aproximou igualdade. 31 ... a5 foi um movimento exato Karjakin.

Carlsen caiu para trás no relógio pela primeira vez. Rooks se movendo para fora 35 e um empate parecia inevitável. Carlsen apertou um pouco mas não muito e Karjakin defendeu-se muito bem e conseguiu o empate após o lance 42.

Score Magnus Carlsen 0.5 - Sergey Karjakin 0.5

 

 

Fonte: http://theweekinchess.com/

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